Friday, 8 April 2016

Glasgow International - GoMA and Glasgow School of Art

After a day working on the site, we ventured into the city to attend some of the exhibition previews.


COSIMA VON BONIN

WHO'S EXPLOITING WHO IN THE DEEP SEA?

GoMA





Von Bonin’s exhibition Who’s Exploiting Who In The Deep Sea?* brings together a series of works from 2006 onwards exploring the artist’s affection for the creatures of the sea. Working with textiles, music, sculpture, performance, video and painting, her practice is varied and often collaborative in nature.
The artist’s cast of characters are a host of contradictions – approachable creatures who are reminiscent of childhood companions are not what they seem. Weaving together humour with melancholy, these sculptures have ambiguous roles and feelings. Von Bonin is able to use these creatures as agents to explore art history, popular culture and craft, to destabilise perceived constructions of feminism. She has created her own crew to explore the deep sea, where, as an analogy of the human condition it is a true place of the unknown.
The exhibition is co-curated by Director Sarah McCrory and SculptureCenter Curator Ruba Katrib. The exhibition will open in September at SculptureCenter.



TESSA LYNCH

PAINTER’S TABLE

GoMA




Lynch works predominantly with sculpture and performance. Projects develop from research concerned with the emotional impact of the built environment and the questionable existence of the female flâneur, which refers to a man who saunters around observing society, or ‘flâneuse’.
Lynch describes her new exhibition as an architectural drama: a collection of new sculptural works which loosely mimic the objects, scenarios and histories found on her daily commute. The mundane examination of this regular transition from home life to work life generates a self-portrait, exposing what it is to be a female artist living in this city.

Frequently using performance as an active framework for making, Lynch has shared her commute with writers Jenny Richards and Rhona Warwick Paterson to create a new text and performance work. Similar to how a map allows one to navigate city roads and streets, the text offers viewers a script through which one can navigate this installation.





SERENA KORDA

HOLD FAST, STAND SURE, I SCREAM A REVOLUTION





Korda has produced a new sound sculpture that combines her interest in primitive impulses, invented tradition and our skewed relationship to nature. Taking her inspiration from the politically radical history of Garnethill (where the Reid Gallery is situated), Korda continues her investigation into ‘thin places’, anomalies in the landscape which were viewed in pre-Christian times as access points to the afterlife. Foraging expeditions on the Isle of Mull presented the deadly potential of some fungi as possible pathways to ‘thin places’. Mushrooms are imbued in our consciousness as grotesque, magic and poisonous. They attract and repulse in equal measure.
Korda is producing a series of sound experiments performed by an army of ‘agitators’ gathered from the communities of Garnethill and Mull.
Supported by Glasgow International, The Glasgow School of Art, Comar and The Henry Moore Foundation.

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